Keynote lectures (under continuous update)

Mr. HAN ADMIRAAL

Mr. HAN ADMIRAAL

Owner and managing director of Enprodes Management Consultancy BV, Netherlands

URBAN INTEGRATED UNDERGROUND SPACES

In this keynote, Han Admiraal will look into the contemporary use of urban underground space and argue that we need to leave the age of single use spaces behind us. As we enter the Anthropocene, the era representing humankind’s interference with the natural processes, we need to find new ways of using underground spaces. This requires these spaces to be used for multiple uses, contribute to preventing overshooting the ecological ceiling, contributing to the social foundation of cities, and be part of circularity. It will be argued that if underground space use has a role to play in the future of our cities, that role must be one of helping cities meet the challenges they face. The keynote will draw on examples and principles given in the book ‘Underground Spaces Unveiled: Planning and Creating the Cities of the Future’, which Han Admiraal co-authored together with Antonia Cornaro.

HAN ADMIRAAL – SHORT BIO

Han Admiraal (1959) studied Civil Engineering at the University for Applied Science in Rotterdam. He obtained a MBA from Twente University. He worked for the Netherlands Government for 20 years, and was Project Manager for the first TBM driven tunnel in soft soil in the Netherlands. Han Admiraal became Executive Director of the COB knowledge centre, and stayed there for 10 years. At the same time, he was a part time professor of Underground Space at Zeeland University of Applied Science in Vlissingen. In 2008, he founded Enprodes Management Consultancy and is based in Delft. He is a strategist & thought leader on the use of underground space. In March 2018, his first book ‘Underground Spaces Unveiled’, written together with Antonia Cornaro, was published. He is co-chair of ITACUS, the ITA Committee on Underground Space.

 

Professor Xiongyao XIE

Professor Xiongyao XIE

Tongji University, China

Smart Technology for Settlement Control Towards Zero Deformation Shield Tunneling

Settlement control has always been the first concern for all the participants of shield tunneling construction when the shield TBM passes through sensitive buildings, especially in urban areas. This keynote presents the practice of smart settlement control technologies in shield tunneling construction, including the ground penetrating radar (GPR) based tail void grouting detection, deep learning based tunnel face pressure prediction, and real-time sensing the tunneling parameters as well as the settlement. Morever, the applications of shield TBM passed through raily trakcs, adjacent buildings, power tunnels and operation subway tunnel are demonstrated, which achieved nearly zero settlement control.

Professor Xiongyao XIE

Xiongyao Xie is graduate of Tongji University. He is a professor at Tongji University, and now is the vice dean in the School of civil engineering in Tongji University. Prof. Xie also serves as the director of the committee of young scientist of Chinese Rock Mechanics and Engineering Society.

Xiongyao Xie is strongly involved in academic research (120 journal papers), as well as in partnership with companies and local government in the field of non-destructive test, structural health monitoring and smart underground construction.

 

Professor Levermore Geoffrey

Professor Levermore Geoffrey

Professor, The School of Mechanical, Aerospace & Civil Engineering (MACE) University of Manchester, UK

More smart underground space and infrastructure to mitigate and adapt to climate change

As global temperatures increase with climate change, developing countries develop and urban populations increase so the demand for air conditioning increases. The air conditioning, although improving in efficiency with time, will require more electricity which in turn needs more infrastructure and without care could mean more fossil fuel consumption. This is important as already buildings contribute over a third of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions. One possible solution is to have more underground buildings or use more earth sheltered buildings to reduce the need for air conditioning. This paper explores the background, the latest developments to thermal comfort and air conditioning and the driving forces of climate change and the urban heat island. It then examines the hypothesis for more underground buildings and whether it could reduce the need for air conditioning.

Professor Levermore Geoffrey

Prof G Levermore,Emeritus Professor of Manchester University, author of about 100 refereed journal papers, 44 invited papers and lectures and 25 book chapters and books. Investigator on grants worth £14.53m,  17 with UK Research Councils worth £12.75m, PI on 12 worth £2.27m. In 2007 he was one of the Lead Authors of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) awarded the Nobel Peace Prize with Al Gore. Chair of the Task Group and editor of CIBSE Guide A Environmental Design, Chapter A2  External Design Data 1999, 2006 and 2013. From 2002 to 2009 he was cpordinator of Working Commission W108: ‘Impact of climate change on the built environment’ of the International Council for Research and Innovation in Building and Construction (CIB). In 2010 he was awarded a CIBSE Silver Medal. He was Principal Investigator (PI) for EPSRC Scorchio (EP/E017398/1) which investigated the impact of climate change on vulnerable people and buildings. He was also PI for EPSRC COPSE ((EP/F038178/1) which developed future weather years, based on the UKCP09 climate projections, for building simulation. COPSE also analysed the urban heat island effect for Manchester. Prof Levermore is still researching, analyzing the urban heat island and its effects and giving lectures but on a part-time basis.

 

Dr. Didier SUBRIN

Dr. Didier SUBRIN

Head of the “Engineering Geology and Geotechnical Design” , Centre for tunnel studies (CETU), France

Tunneling-induced effects on neighboring structures: how to manage the risks within design and construction?

The conference will deal with the effects of tunnelling (mainly from ground movements) on the neighbouring constructions (i.e., buildings, structures and utilities potentially being affected by the works).  It will bring some responses to questions arising in present practice due to the strong relaunching of underground works in urban areas : how to manage the project within a risk-based approach ? how to gather data on the neighbouring structures so as to allow a reliable vulnerability assessment ? what knowledge has been recently gained from experimental and theoretical results on the mechanical interactions between the tunnelling works, the ground and the surrounding structures ? how to to spread them into operational practice ? what innovative constructive solutions and measuring devices ? The conference will be illustrated through recent case studies from TBM as well as conventional tunnel excavations.

Dr. Didier Subrin

is head of the “Engineering Geology and Geotechnical Design” Department at the Centre for tunnel studies (CETU). PhD in Civil Engineering from the National School of Public Works (ENTPE) and the Rock Mechanics Laboratory of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL). Involved in tunneling projects at each operational stage: feasibility studies, basic and detailed design, construction works and expertise after failure. Scientific and operational research interests with a focus on field observations: geotechnical design issues around underground structures, tunneling at shallow depth and vulnerability of surrounding structures, tunneling at great depth and squeezing behavior, integration of geotechnical risk management within tender contracts. Member of the Technical Committee of the French Tunneling Association and of the French Committee of Rock Mechanics affiliated to the International Society for Rock Mechanics (ISRM).

 

Professor Jingfeng Wang

Professor Jingfeng Wang

Executive Dean of School of Civil and Hydraulic Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, China

Progresses on intelligent construction and operation maintenance of urban under-lake tunnels

China is currently at an important stage of urbanization. In recent years, the number and scale of under-lake tunnels in southern cities of China are growing consistently, which brings opportunities and challenges in intelligent construction and operation maintenance. Due to the long length of the under-lake tunnel, the large volume of concrete to be cast, the complex environment of the buried section and the underground environment of the lake bottom, the hydration heat and stress crack have been the main challenges of the under-lake tunnel engineering in crack control and waterproofing aspect. Simultaneously, with the development of big data, intelligent construction, information technology, and other techniques, these techniques are gradually applied to the whole life cycle of tunnel engineering including survey, design, construction, operation, and maintenance. The construction of the lake tunnel project is setting off a new round of technological innovation. This paper systematically summarizes the technical breakthroughs and application of technologies such as intelligent construction and information technology in the construction of under-lake tunnels in China, and puts forward reasonable suggestions on the key technologies of intelligent construction and operation maintenance for urban under-lake tunnel engineering.

Professor Jingfeng Wang

Prof. Wang was awarded as the outstanding talent in the new century of the Ministry of Education, the first batch of professors of Huangshan Young Scholars, and the leading talent for Anhui province steel structure.His main research interests include steel structure and composite structure, intelligent construction and assembly technology, and seismic damage prevention of engineering structures. He has published more than 180 academic papers, including more than 50 papers in SCI-indexed journals and 38 patents (14 invention patents). He has published 2 monographs, 9 textbooks, and compiled 24 national, industry and provincial-level standards (atlas). He was awarded the first (one item), second (two items) and third (one item) prize of provincial and ministerial-level science and technology awards. He is a member of the editorial board of the International SCI-indexed Journal “International Steel Structure Magazine”, the editorial board of the Chinese core journal “Progress in Construction Steel Structure”, the deputy director of the Steel Structure Professional Committee of Anhui Civil Engineering Association, and the vice president of Anhui Steel Structure Association. He has presided over nearly 30 national and provincial scientific research projects. He is also an expert in the evaluation of international science and technology cooperation projects.

 

Dr. Marwan Al HEIB

Dr. Marwan Al HEIB

Institut national de l'environnement industriel et des risques (INERIS), France

Pros and cons of smart valorisation and re-use of abandoned underground cavities

This Keynote lecture deals with the sustainable development of abandoned cavities and underground structures. We discuss the pros and cons of such actions. In fact, France has had a significant historical underground activity. These cavities must be intelligently managed and valued. Cavities should not only be considered as a source of nuisance or risk but may also be an element of sustainable development. The challenges of the society including climate change, energy and ecological issues, calls for a change in the organization and physiology of the city in order to move towards a more sustainable city model. The underground space can contribute to make the city sustainable.

The keynote presents some strategic orientations of valorisation of abandoned underground excavations: visits, storage, etc. We present the conditions and the urbanistic modalities of smart re-use of the underground “Brasserie” limestone exploitation(Paris – France) and discuss how these valorisations may contribute to the maintenance of voids and risk prevention.

Dr. Marwan Al Heib

Marwan Al Heibobtained his Master’s degree in Civil Engineering in 1983. He holds a PhD (1992) in Rock Mechanics and numerical modeling from Nancy University, and a Habilitation (2009) (highest academic qualification after a PhD in European countries) in Modeling in Rock Mechanics Applied to Mining from the Polytechnic National Institute of Lorraine. He works at the INERIS (Institut National de l’Environnement Industriel et des Risques), as a project leader and research program coordinator. Throughout his career, Mr. Al Heib has investigated scientific problems related to underground cavities. He is an expert from the European Community. He has published more than 200 scientific papers.

 

Professor Isam  Shahrour

Professor Isam Shahrour

Laboratoire de Génie Civil et géo-Environnement- Lille University

Use of the smart city concept for underground space resiliency

The keynote presents first challenges related to the underground space hazards, which are related to natural disasters as well as construction, industrial and human hazards. It shows how resiliency could help to improve our capacity to cope with these challenges and then how the use of the smart city solution through smart monitoring, advanced data analysis using artificial intelligence and control system could enhance the underground space resiliency.

Professor Isam Shahrour

Isam Shahrour is graduate of the High School of Bridges and Roads (Paris). He is professor at Lille University, director of the Civil and geo-Environmental Engineering Laboratory. He is the founder and coordinator of  “SunRise Smart City” initiative, which aims at building large-scale demonstrators of the Smart and Sustainable City. 

He is strongly involved in academic research (120 journal papers and around 30 invited conferences), as well as in partnership with companies and local government in the field of smart and sustainable cities and infrastructures. He is associate editor of Infrastructures Journal (MDPI) and Smart Cities Journal (MDPI).